Daily Archives: 4:39 PM, September 11, 2010

An Open Letter to Those Who Believe Obama Isn’t Actually President

To: All you “Birthers” who think that Obama isn’t a natural-born citizen

According to U.S. Constitution Online, Article 1, Section 8, Clause 4 of the Constitution allows Congress to create laws regarding naturalization, including citizenship. According to Cornell University Law School, Section 1401 of the U.S. Code states:

The following shall be nationals and citizens of the United States at birth:

(a) a person born in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof;

. . .

(g) a person born outside the geographical limits of the United States and its outlying possessions of parents one of whom is an alien, and the other a citizen of the United States who, prior to the birth of such person, was physically present in the United States or its outlying possessions for a period or periods totaling not less than five years, at least two of which were after attaining the age of fourteen years

U.S. Constitution Online writes, “Anyone falling into these categories is considered natural-born, and is eligible to run for President.”

Barack Hussein Obama: in which category does he fall? Continue reading

And Why Should I Not Be Allowed to Run for President?

I know there numerous issues more pressing than this, and I realize that life isn’t fair, but can we just pause for a moment to note how unfair it is that I can’t run for President? As an international adoptee (a “naturalized citizen”), I am one of the few groups of people who, despite having lived in the United States and been a United States citizen for as long as I can remember (since I was six months old, which, in eight days, will be 22 years), are legally and constitutionally barred from running for the office of the President of the United States. Continue reading

Thesis Trouble

The thesis is such an integral part of the Bryn Mawr experience that it has its own Step Sing song (“I’ve Been Working On My Thesis”), and it’s the beginning of another (“Colossal Pain”). Everyone knows about theses: we’re told horror stories about them for three years.

Perhaps needless to say, I was nervous about the thesis process (“terrified” might be a more accurate word — if some of the seniors I’d talked to were to be believed, my thesis was going to eat my soul). The start of junior year rolled around, and I still had no idea what the topic of my thesis would be. Oh, I had mumbled a little to the philosophy major advisor the spring before about queer theory (not that I had read any Foucault or ever studied queer theory at Bryn Mawr), but after not managing to get through either of the Judith Butler books I had checked out over the summer, that was looking less and less promising. To make matters worse, my thesis advisor was on some kind of emergency medical leave for the first half of the semester. Better and better, right? Continue reading