Tag Archives: bullying

“Don’t Laugh At Me”

I first heard Mark Wills’ song “Don’t Laugh At Me” at camp, almost ten years ago. It’s a lovely song — the music itself tugs at my heartstrings a little, and the lyrics send a powerful message. It’s not perfect, and I’m a bit uncomfortable with the implication that it is because god views us as equals that bullying isn’t acceptable, but I do like that it seems honest and real.

Don’t laugh at me / Don’t call me names / Don’t get your pleasure from my pain” — It doesn’t try to pretend that we should all live together as one big happy family; all the song asks for is for people to be acknowledged and be recognized as fellow humans, for people not to be torn down in order to make others feel better about themselves. Is that so much to ask? Continue reading

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Riki Wilchins Is My Hero


Riki Anne Wilchins and Me

Riki Wilchins is so amazing. So acessible and approachable, humorous, totally spot on. So real and down-to-earth. Just incredible.

When I was just beginning to explore the idea of gender beyond the binary, and what it meant to be trans, one of the books that most influenced by thinking was GenderQueer: Voices From Beyond the Sexual Binary, edited by Riki Wilchins, Clare Howell, and Joan Nestle. In particular, Wilchins’ four essays in the beginning of the anthology made an enormous impact on me, personally and academically. They were the perfect example of kind of trans that was forming in my mind — a trans concept very different from the classic narrative — and I relied on them heavily as I began thinking about, and writing, my thesis. Continue reading

Actually, No, Violence Is Not The Answer

The person here at ninebullets.net claims that the whole “wear purple to show solidarity” thing is stupid. I agree that it doesn’t work as a response to bullying; purple shirts worn on the 20th of October don’t have magic powers that stop people from getting bullied. However, that doesn’t seem to be the reason why people wore purple shirts yesterday. It was symbolic. It was in solidarity. Perhaps it was more for the people wearing the shirts than for the people being bullied — a way to make some kind of statement that bullying is wrong, even if the people being bullied don’t see that message. Continue reading

An End to Bullying

Oh, for the love of Athena, people! I keep seeing stories about kids committing suicide because people bullied them about being — or appearing to be — gay. This week alone, I’ve read about three teens who have died due to bullying: Asher Brown, Seth Walsh, and Tyler Clementi. Billy Lucas also died this month. It breaks my heart that these kids saw no option other than killing themselves.

How many people must commit suicide — how many people must die — before we finally take a stand and say that this is enough? How many people must die before people realize that we all deserve to be safe from bullying and violence, regardless of our gender, sex, sexual orientation, race, religion, ability, athletic preferences, class, clothing choices? Continue reading