Tag Archives: death penalty

Georgia Killed Him

Troy Davis died tonight at 11:08 PM ET. The state of Georgia killed him. After four hours of deliberation, the Supreme Court decided to deny a last-minute stay of execution, and so Georgia went throught with it.

Before Troy Davis died, he had the following to say:

I’d like to address the MacPhail family. Let you know, despite the situation you are in, I’m not the one who personally killed your son, your father, your brother. I am innocent. The incident that happened that night is not my fault. I did not have a gun. All I can ask . . . is that you look deeper into this case so that you really can finally see the truth. I ask my family and friends to continue to fight this fight. For those about to take my life, God have mercy on your souls. And may God bless your souls.

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Don’t Let Them Kill Troy Davis

Troy Davis will be killed at 7:00 PM EDT tomorrow, Wednesday, September 21st, 2011. The state of Georgia has sentenced him to death for a crime for which “no forensic or DNA evidence linking Davis to the shooting has ever been found, and nor has the murder weapon.” He has been on death row for nearly as long as I have been alive.

Amnesty International urges people to demand that “Chatham County (Savannah) District Attorney Larry Chisolm seek a withdrawal of the death warrant and support clemency himself” (Chatham County’s District Attorney’s office’s contact information: Telephone: 912-652-7308   Fax: 912-652-7328). Their petition to the Georgia Pardons Board and District Attorney Chisolm is still available hereCall Judge Penny Freesemann at Telephone: 912-652-7252 who has to accept the DA’s withdrawal.

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Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness? Maybe Not So Much

Today is July 4th — “Independence Day.” All over the internet, people are posting about freedom and liberty. The U.S. is, after all, the country of liberty for all, right? Or at least, that’s what some people like to say. Kai Wright, on the other hand, recently wrote a post for Colorlines called “How To Celebrate the Fourth of July: Read Frederick Douglass.” His post comments on the U.S.’s history of oppression and reminds that there should be more to the Fourth of July than blind patriotism. Continue reading