Tag Archives: homophobia

Continuing Thoughts about Abusive Language at Work

As a queer, trans person of color, when I think of someone aiming abusive language at me, I immediately think of deeply hateful racist, homophobic, transphobic language. Words of sexual violence, people telling me that the world would be better off if I were dead, being told that I am less than human. I have not personally experienced that, but I know that others like me have, and so the potential for that is always in the back of my mind.

As irrational as it is, when I was told that I’ll just have to deal with abusive language at work, that’s what I thought of. Being called an idiot, or being yelled at because the person is frustrated with the company is one thing — something that will probably upset me, but something that I can deal with. But emotionally, it felt as though I were being told that I must deal with the rest, and that was unacceptable. Continue reading

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Fag

A while back, I came across an article online from Vanity Fair regarding a then-recent episode of Glee. Brett Berk, the writer — an openly gay man who uses the term “faggy” to refer to himself — uses the term “fags” in a relatively innocuous way, referring to the Dalton Warblers of Glee, and it created an immediate uproar. Frankly, though, all of the ‘no one should ever use that horrible word, and he should be fired!’ people upset me more than his use of the word did. Continue reading

Riki Wilchins Is My Hero


Riki Anne Wilchins and Me

Riki Wilchins is so amazing. So acessible and approachable, humorous, totally spot on. So real and down-to-earth. Just incredible.

When I was just beginning to explore the idea of gender beyond the binary, and what it meant to be trans, one of the books that most influenced by thinking was GenderQueer: Voices From Beyond the Sexual Binary, edited by Riki Wilchins, Clare Howell, and Joan Nestle. In particular, Wilchins’ four essays in the beginning of the anthology made an enormous impact on me, personally and academically. They were the perfect example of kind of trans that was forming in my mind — a trans concept very different from the classic narrative — and I relied on them heavily as I began thinking about, and writing, my thesis. Continue reading

Maybe I Am A Friendly Queer

I just read the ever-fabulous Kate Sosin‘s piece “Myth of Virtue: The Unfriendly Queer” on his blog The New Gender, and it was a revelation. Go check it out, and then come back and finish this (or this isn’t going to make much sense).

It’s easy to fall into the trap of trying to be “queer enough” and “radical enough.” As Kate puts it, “Over the past few years, I’ve come to find that the word ‘queer’ increasingly carries with it a set of rules, especially if it is teemed with the word ‘radical.'” There is so much pressure to be a certain kind of queer. I’m not even entirely positive where that pressure comes from, just that I know I feel it. And quite frankly, it gets exhausting. Continue reading

Actually, No, Violence Is Not The Answer

The person here at ninebullets.net claims that the whole “wear purple to show solidarity” thing is stupid. I agree that it doesn’t work as a response to bullying; purple shirts worn on the 20th of October don’t have magic powers that stop people from getting bullied. However, that doesn’t seem to be the reason why people wore purple shirts yesterday. It was symbolic. It was in solidarity. Perhaps it was more for the people wearing the shirts than for the people being bullied — a way to make some kind of statement that bullying is wrong, even if the people being bullied don’t see that message. Continue reading

Why I Disagree with Obama About Discrimination

President Obama recently said, “we don’t make determinations about who we love. That’s why I think discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation is wrong.” I realize that’s a common view (among people who don’t think being gay is wrong). I appreciate that Obama is against discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation. However, I don’t necessarily agree with him. Continue reading

Children’s Books Teaching Homophobia and Transphobia

Are you serious? I just came back from a vigil in memory of the 9 teens who killed themselves last month because of anti-gay bullying. And then I discovered this link about the book Chased by an Elephant, the Gospel Truth about Today’s Stampeding Sexuality, by Janice Barrett Graham, which is apparently intended to “help shed the clear light of truth on today’s dark and tangled ideas about male and female, proper gender roles, the law of chastity, and the God-given sexual appetite.” The book “champions ex-gay therapy and curing people of their homosexuality.” Continue reading