Tag Archives: politics

House Republicans Approved $1.5 Million to Defend DOMA

“It is absolutely unconscionable that Speaker Boehner is tripling the cost for his legal boondoggle to defend the indefensible Defense of Marriage Act,” said Drew Hammill, spokesman for House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.). “At a time when Americans are hurting and job creation should be the top priority, it just shows how out of touch House Republicans have become that they would spend up to $1.5 million dollars to defend discrimination in our country.”
–Amanda Terkel, The Huffington Post

This is ridiculous. No, wait, this is beyond ridiculous. I may need to check a thesaurus for a new word because, well, really? Are they serious? I know that the majority of Republicans in the House of Representatives are . . . shall we say, not people with whom I have many political views in common, but wanting to spend $1.5 million on a lawyer to defend the “Defense of Marriage” Act is just absurd.  Continue reading

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Five Things I’m Afraid to Write About

The Daily Post’s Topic #274: Make a list of 5 things you’re afraid to write about

While I was brainstorming for this post, I couldn’t think of a whole lot of topics — I’ve published over three hundred posts, and I’ve covered a fairly wide range of topics. As I was writing it, however, I kept thinking of new things that I’ve found myself avoiding. I may end up making another post titled “Five Additional Things About Which I’m Afraid to Write” (yes, ending the title with a preposition bothers me a little, although it’s clearly not stopping me).  Continue reading

I Will Not Lose Myself At This Job

Oh my Athena, this is going to be a long year. My first two weeks at work have been stressful; navigating the clash between my politics and this job has been especially difficult. To be honest, I was feeling overwhelmed, exhausted, and rather freaked out by the end of the first week (well, starting on the first day, even). And then, late Saturday night this past weekend, I discovered something from a friend that centered me a bit and revitalized my belief that I can get through this without losing myself.  Continue reading

The Kind of Politics I Value

When I think of role models, activists I respect, and new organizations with which I want to be involved, it’s important that their politics are in line with mine. But when I say “politics,” I mean it in a very particular way. I’m not talking about politicians or Democrats versus Republicans. I don’t mean politics in the sense of “playing the game.” For me, the real kind of politics involves how we live our lives, how we treat others, and how we approach the world. CrimethInc calls it “the politics of our everyday lives.”

Are you aware of your privilege? If so, what do you do about it, and how do you react when someone brings it up? (And don’t deny that it exists because we pretty much all have some form of privilege or another, even if it doesn’t play out in the same way.) Do you believe in the status quo? What are your thoughts about policing, capitalism, sex work, the prison industrial complex, marriage, the government, sexuality, the criminal legal system, academia, immigration, poverty, prisoners? How about socio-economic class, monogamy, power, gender, the existence of racism and sexism in U.S. society, kink, ability, education, body size, the role of religion, sex? What do you consider to be mainstream, radical, conservative, or liberal? What do you think is your purpose in the world? Continue reading

A Timeline of US Deficits (From Political Animal)

Steve Benen put together a timeline of events (mostly U.S. deficit-related) for Washington Monthly. I then discovered it on Facebook (where, to be honest, I get most of my news that doesn’t come from The Rachel Maddow Show). And now I will be posting a link to it here. Basically, the majority of congressional Republicans just don’t make any sense.  Continue reading

My Reading Lists: What I Want To Read

I’ve never been very good about reading one book at a time. There are so many books, and there’s so little time — I’m nearly always in the middle of several books at a time. I’ve recently finished Queer (In)Justice (written by Joey Mogul, Andrea Ritchie, and Kay Whitlock), which I’d strongly recommend to everyone, and I just started Michelle Alexander’s The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness yesterday (I can already tell it’s going to be excellent). I’m also in the middle of The Revolution Will Not Be Funded: Beyond the Non-Profit Industrial Complex, by INCITE! Women of Color Against Violence, which I’ve been working my way through it for a while nowContinue reading

What Chicago Has Done For Me

When I was in A.P. Biology, during my junior year in high school, we raised Monarch butterflies: we watched them grow from little dots on a leaf into beautiful butterflies. Actually watching them emerge from their chrysalises as fully formed butterflies was amazing. In some ways, I feel like Chicago has helped me with my own butterfly-like transformation. Continue reading