Tag Archives: racism

Continuing Thoughts about Abusive Language at Work

As a queer, trans person of color, when I think of someone aiming abusive language at me, I immediately think of deeply hateful racist, homophobic, transphobic language. Words of sexual violence, people telling me that the world would be better off if I were dead, being told that I am less than human. I have not personally experienced that, but I know that others like me have, and so the potential for that is always in the back of my mind.

As irrational as it is, when I was told that I’ll just have to deal with abusive language at work, that’s what I thought of. Being called an idiot, or being yelled at because the person is frustrated with the company is one thing — something that will probably upset me, but something that I can deal with. But emotionally, it felt as though I were being told that I must deal with the rest, and that was unacceptable. Continue reading

Advertisements

What’s Really Going On In Boystown

There has been a great deal of anger, controversy, and discussion regarding recent events in Boystown. Waves of racism have flooded Facebook’s “Take Back Boystown,” often under the pretense of concern about safety, labeling youth of color as a danger to Boystown. Avi Rudnick, project attorney at the Transformative Justice Law Project of Illinois (TJLP), has writtten an excellent and insightful article for Windy City Times that views these debates in a new light. He writes, “Instead of focusing on making only Boystown safe for residents, the focus should be on creating communities free from violence.” Continue reading

Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness? Maybe Not So Much

Today is July 4th — “Independence Day.” All over the internet, people are posting about freedom and liberty. The U.S. is, after all, the country of liberty for all, right? Or at least, that’s what some people like to say. Kai Wright, on the other hand, recently wrote a post for Colorlines called “How To Celebrate the Fourth of July: Read Frederick Douglass.” His post comments on the U.S.’s history of oppression and reminds that there should be more to the Fourth of July than blind patriotism. Continue reading

I Just Can’t Do This Right Now

I know I said that I would respond to yesterday’s blog post about Aura Blogando’s response to SlutWalk today. I should, and I will, but just not today. I just can’t do it right now. Emotionally, mentally, I need some time. A few minutes ago, I finished reading one of the most blatantly transphobic pieces I’ve read in a long time (on FoxNews.com about Chaz Bono) — someone linked to it on Facebook, and I ignored the voice in my head telling me to just skip it. And the sheer transphobia of it (not at all masked by a pretense of pseudo-science) just makes me want to cry. Usually, I’d dismiss it as the utter b.s. it is, or I’d get angry and in the mood to fight injustice. But right now, it just makes me want to cry, or hide, and that’s how I can tell I need a break.  Continue reading

My Reading Lists: What I Want To Read

I’ve never been very good about reading one book at a time. There are so many books, and there’s so little time — I’m nearly always in the middle of several books at a time. I’ve recently finished Queer (In)Justice (written by Joey Mogul, Andrea Ritchie, and Kay Whitlock), which I’d strongly recommend to everyone, and I just started Michelle Alexander’s The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness yesterday (I can already tell it’s going to be excellent). I’m also in the middle of The Revolution Will Not Be Funded: Beyond the Non-Profit Industrial Complex, by INCITE! Women of Color Against Violence, which I’ve been working my way through it for a while nowContinue reading

Checking My Privilege

One of the biggest things I’ve been dealing with since coming to Chicago — particularly since starting my internship with TJLP — has been learning to see, and check, my own privilege. Continue reading

Don’t Tell Me You “Don’t See Race”

Originally posted at 5:52 PM, February 11, 2010

I’ve heard several people say that they “don’t see race” or “don’t see color.” Without exception, these people have all been white. All of them meant well, certainly; I assume that what they meant was that they do not consider themselves prejudiced against people of color. Still, a statement that one “doesn’t see race” — in this society, at least — reeks of white privilege. Allan G. Johnson quotes James Baldwin in Privilege, Power, and Difference: “To be white in America means not having to think about it” (22). Continue reading