Tag Archives: society

The Kind of Politics I Value

When I think of role models, activists I respect, and new organizations with which I want to be involved, it’s important that their politics are in line with mine. But when I say “politics,” I mean it in a very particular way. I’m not talking about politicians or Democrats versus Republicans. I don’t mean politics in the sense of “playing the game.” For me, the real kind of politics involves how we live our lives, how we treat others, and how we approach the world. CrimethInc calls it “the politics of our everyday lives.”

Are you aware of your privilege? If so, what do you do about it, and how do you react when someone brings it up? (And don’t deny that it exists because we pretty much all have some form of privilege or another, even if it doesn’t play out in the same way.) Do you believe in the status quo? What are your thoughts about policing, capitalism, sex work, the prison industrial complex, marriage, the government, sexuality, the criminal legal system, academia, immigration, poverty, prisoners? How about socio-economic class, monogamy, power, gender, the existence of racism and sexism in U.S. society, kink, ability, education, body size, the role of religion, sex? What do you consider to be mainstream, radical, conservative, or liberal? What do you think is your purpose in the world? Continue reading

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A Timeline of US Deficits (From Political Animal)

Steve Benen put together a timeline of events (mostly U.S. deficit-related) for Washington Monthly. I then discovered it on Facebook (where, to be honest, I get most of my news that doesn’t come from The Rachel Maddow Show). And now I will be posting a link to it here. Basically, the majority of congressional Republicans just don’t make any sense.  Continue reading

5 Things That Make Me Happy — Focusing on the Positive, Not the Negative

There’s a whole lot of negativity going on right now — CeCe being assaulted and then charged with murder, all of the stuff going down in Boystown right now, and millions of other situations to which I don’t have a direct connection and emotional investment. It all makes it hard to feel positive about society. And so, instead of blogging myself even deeper into a “the world is awful” mentality, I decided that I’m going to focus on positive things. Continue reading

Listening to the Right Voice

EXPLORING TRANS — THURSDAY, JULY 1, 2010, 12:38 AM

It sometimes seems as though there’s this societal insistence that gender can only be either personal or social. It’s either directly due to people as individuals, or it’s solely the result of socialization. Furthermore, I, at least, have felt a message that it needs to be individual, in order to be “real” or “authentic” or “legitimate.”

There’s this idea that how I feel about my gender, or how I present myself, isn’t real if it’s influenced by society. It’s only considered legitimate if I do something because it’s what I want for myself, not because I want others to view me in a certain way. And while I understand and respect the importance of staying true to oneself and not being too bothered by the rest of the world, it’s an undeniable fact that we’re influenced by society. Continue reading

Response to Single Dad Laughing

A friend on Facebook recently linked to a post called “Worthless women and the men who make them” from a blog called “Single Dad Laughing” in which a (straight) guy laments about how the men of the world have destroyed women with this notion of the perfect woman. So many women are praising him for being amazing and wonderful and sensitive, and it’s just not sitting quite right with me. Don’t get me wrong, I think it’s nice that he’s realizing that when women feel insecure about their looks, it’s not just on them individually. I just . . . don’t really like the post. Continue reading

Reclaiming Masculinity

In many ways, when I first came out as trans, I was very much alone. I was attending a women’s college — and while not everyone there identified as a woman, from the people I knew or knew of, the openly trans / genderqueer / gender-variant population of my college was roughly one-half of one percent of the college’s undergrad population. I was sort of making things up as I went along. Continue reading

Riki Wilchins Is My Hero


Riki Anne Wilchins and Me

Riki Wilchins is so amazing. So acessible and approachable, humorous, totally spot on. So real and down-to-earth. Just incredible.

When I was just beginning to explore the idea of gender beyond the binary, and what it meant to be trans, one of the books that most influenced by thinking was GenderQueer: Voices From Beyond the Sexual Binary, edited by Riki Wilchins, Clare Howell, and Joan Nestle. In particular, Wilchins’ four essays in the beginning of the anthology made an enormous impact on me, personally and academically. They were the perfect example of kind of trans that was forming in my mind — a trans concept very different from the classic narrative — and I relied on them heavily as I began thinking about, and writing, my thesis. Continue reading